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TOPIC: Applying sfz parameters to wave files

Applying sfz parameters to wave files 4 weeks 3 hours ago #19

  • Cyrille Briegel
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There are 3 different versions of G-stomper. The basic version (rhythm), which is a basic drum machine, the studio and the producer versions. Those two versions include a synth module that support sfz file import. However, not all parameters are supported unfortunately.
I know it's possible to manually edit each wave samples with a sound editor, but there are over 70 samples and I just can't spend that much time for this. If you have a good working updated version of the Papelmedia strings ensemble, I would greatly appreciate!
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Applying sfz parameters to wave files 3 weeks 6 days ago #20

  • Michael
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pabstblueribbon.stackstorage.com/s/1vP1WobgNyoBRxuA

Here you can download my altered version of the strings from Papelmedia.

The password is: Tristan
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Applying sfz parameters to wave files 3 weeks 5 days ago #21

  • bottrop
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i downloaded your PapelMediaStrings soundfont.
you say you set all sample rates to the same value, but looking in the SampleView i see all different sample rates, some of them very low (which means a very low playback quality)
ArcoBasses26.wav for example has a sample rate of 22050 Hrz and you assigned a Root Key 38 to it, so it plays far below 22050 Hrz.
this is not the way to make a soundfont, you should have a sample rate of at least 44K and assign as Root Key the actual pitch of the sample.
regards bottrop
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Applying sfz parameters to wave files 3 weeks 4 days ago #22

  • Michael
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Then it's not my final version I've shared here :unsure:

I've found this strings soundfont at Warbeats.com. I already had some other soundfonts from Papermedia. I've spent much time to remove all the duplicate samples.

I noticed later all the samples in this soundfont are originally from E-MU's Proteus-2 presets.

The soundfonts from E-MU were developed in the 90s for hardware samplers. Sample memory was limited during those days, so they had to use lower samplerates.

Lower samplerates doesn't automatically refer to a worse sound quality. You can presently obtain soundbanks of gigabites in filesize with 24bit high samplerate samples and still the soundbank sounds like crap.

However you can correct the SF2 yourself. You can use Audacity to calculate the correction by using the "Change Pitch" effect. Suppose the sample originally has a samplerate of 25000 and you've changed that to 44100 (which speeds up the playback rate) than you have to correct it by a transposition of 10 semitones down and tuning it up with 17 cents.

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Applying sfz parameters to wave files 3 weeks 4 days ago #23

  • bottrop
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i just had a look at it, i am not interested anymore in the PapelmediaStrings, i bought that sf2 about 15 years ago for the vocals and extracted a few of the best stringsamples to build stringsections. now i am using the VSCO2 strings.
for the average human ear 44100Hrz 16bit is sufficient, but lower values sound like an old fashioned telephone and will cause distortions when played along with higher sample rate samples. 24bit has nothing to do with it, that is just the grid and old ears like mine are way too slow to hear the details.
of course quality of the sound is not the same as quality of the recording, the iowa samples for example are excellent recordings of lousy players, the symphonia orchestra samples are lousy recordings of excellent players.
i know how to transpose a sample, i use Soundforge ever since the Sound Blaster Live! and the Creative soundfont editer were released.
regards bottrop
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